Please come back #MakersWeLove Vol. 2

Some things in life you can’t get enough of and really miss when they’re gone. As supporters of all things handmade (and well-made) in India, we can’t help but wish the following makers would start making and selling their products again and again. After all, products so beautiful deserve to be with us for years and years to come.

Some things in life you can’t get enough of and really miss when they’re gone. As supporters of all things handmade (and well-made) in India, we can’t help but wish the following makers would start making and selling their products again and again. After all, products so beautiful deserve to be with us for years and years to come.

And on that note, let’s meet the Makers we’d like to see back in action soon.

She Sells

Who is She Sells? She Sells is the clever brand name Jewellery designer Salonee Gadgil gave to her beautiful creations made out of gifts from the sea. Gifts from the sea? Allow us to elaborate.

Salonee Gadgil creates mind-blowing art out of the shells and trinkets and other interesting things she keeps an eye out for during the numerous walks she takes on the beaches of Goa, where she lives (thus the name ‘She Sells’).

Put simply, She the Salonee seflls (or used to sell) jewellery made with left overs discarded by the sea. It was unique, natural, and eco-friendly. We think it deserves to be back and a part of our lives for many more years to come.

You can see more of what she used to sell on She Sells’ Facebook Page.

Small Idea

Shirali Patel is the artist behind Small Idea. Her ideas and designs are whimsical, quirky, utilitarian with a touch of humour and very realistic. Her work is imbued with minute and painstakingly applied details. Food miniatures, in particular, Shirali has a deep affinity for. She creates realistic miniatures in polymer clay, which are then custom-designed into unique gifts and products. Shirali has lived in Asia, Middle East, and Africa, and she draws inspiration from all these cultures.

Early in 2005, Shirali accidently found a new medium called polymer clay and fell head-over-heels in love with its versatility and ease-of-creation – a ceramic piece could take weeks to complete, but with polymer clay you can see the results immediately.

In a nutshell, Small Idea is a big idea that deserves more traction. You can see more ideas from Small Idea here. Indeed, we’d love to see much more from Small Idea.

Kaagazi

Kavya Agarwal, from Kanpur, made her mark in Ahmedabad with papers. In an era of technology, she had the courage to use her skills to recreate books, journals, scrapbooks, calendars, sketchbooks and diaries giving it all a designer edge.

A venture she started while at the National Institute of Design, she began by designing handmade books, using a different binding process like tie and dye on paper, leather binding, and more (their up-cycled Amul Tetra Pak books and coloured craft books are out of this world).

Kavya says, “Each Kaagazi book has a personality of its own, they are aesthetically pleasing and serve various purposes and functionalities with their different binding structures. Since they are handmade, these books are customizable in any quantity and to any extent for individuals and organisations.”

Essentially, Kaagazi handmakes khadi watercolour notebooks in different sizes for artists who love to put their ideas down on great paper. Their products are uncommon, gorgeous, and eye-catching. We’d love to see more great ideas on paper in real life from the creative people at Kaagazi. Keep making cool stuff, guys!

While Kaagazi products can be found in a couple of physical stores, we really hope these are available to a larger online audience. We recommend following Kaagazi on Facebook and look out for InstaMojo links appeended to their updates in order to make a purchase.

Fungus Designs

It grows on you, much like technology. Here’s a closer look at what we’re alluding to, Fungus Designs on Facebook.

A chemical engineer from Benaras Hindu University, Raghu Bhat, 37, has no formal training in design or aesthetics, apart from what his 14-year-long and thriving career in advertising and films has given him (Bhat was senior vice president and executive creative director at Contract Advertising, before he left to co-found Scarecrow Communications.)

Raghu won numerous national and international awards for his work in advertising. It was at one of these award shows (at Cannes) that, Bhat says, the idea for Fungus really bore fruit. “As a creative professional, I had found that the best ideas of graphic designers or art directors never saw the light of day because the client rejected them. I floated the idea of making use of these designs to a few of the artists I met at Cannes and I was surprised to find that they were most receptive.”

There’s more to Fungus than designer laptop bags. In fact, the Fungus’ business model is, uniquely, geared toward compensating artists fairly. “We give as much as 35-40 per cent of our profits to our artists.”

Now ask yourself, don’t your tech gadgets deserve a touch of style from Fungus? Doesn’t the young brand deserve to go places? They certainly do. These beauties deserve to be seen by more people. And we’d love to do whatever we can to help them get there.

Nimish Adani

I am the founder & CEO of Engrave. I started off in 2011 with a workshop that engraved photos for customers on to wooden plaques. Soon, we were making plaques, nameplates, canvas prints, decals and dozens of other products for thousands of customers. To help us make these items, we engaged a group of dedicated craftsmen. By 2015, 3 of our dedicated craftsmen had built their own workshops, employing between 6-10 people. By showcasing their skills on a digital platform, these craftsmen had turned into successful entrepreneurs. This success motivated me to transform Engrave in to a platform which could help thousands of Indian artisans and craftspersons - and this lead to the launch of the maker's market in 2015.

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