The Kala Ghoda Arts Festival 2016 Handbook Vol. III: The Traditionalists

In an age of rampant modernisation, the traditional methods of artisans are becoming increasingly esoteric. Kala Ghoda though, thankfully, provides these makers an opportunity to showcase the most stunning forms of art from the days bygone. Volume III of our series lists down some of the best ones for you.

In an age of rampant modernisation, the traditional methods of artisans are becoming increasingly esoteric. Kala Ghoda though, thankfully, provides these makers an opportunity to showcase the most stunning forms of art from the days bygone. On the brink of extinction today, the traditional skills and crafts will either evoke a sense of nostalgia or introduce you to a previously unexplored side of the talented artisans. Either way, volume three of our series lists down some of the best ones for you.

Hello Bastar

Siddharth Lunkad’s Hello Bastar’s story goes beyond his little stall at Kala Ghoda. The 29-year-old from Chattisgarh aims to produce modern products using traditional methods, and thus, relies on the ‘lost wax’ method, which is one of the oldest forms. The products range from home decor products, art installations, lamps, watches, and even corporate gifting products, all of which are forged using iron, copper, brass, and wood. The brand employs scores of artisans and is responsible for the decorations at the AIIMS hospital as well as the Raipur airport. You can find them at stall no. 14.

Indrani’s creations

The art of making products using terracotta isn’t easy. Nigh on two decades into the business, though, and it’s safe to say that Indrani Dey from Kolkata has mastered the art. Terracotta is made from fired up, baked clay, following which Indrani paints on her products like necklaces, earrings, and bangles for that added fine touch.

Ssaha

If you’ve adopted a village and gave 50 artisans a job, you’re already a hero in many people’s eyes. 37-year-old Amira Sudan Saha, in collaboration with a few people, has managed to do just that. A social enterprise, Ssaha produces khadi products like saris, stoles, and other men’s and women’s garments. The catch, though, is that everything is produced on heirlooms using in-house tools. Furthermore, the embellishment and the embroidery too are woven into the khadi on the loom itself — which is remarkable. It’s the brand’s first time at Kala Ghoda, and you can find them at stall no. 25.

Studio Enoy

While most brands focus on one form of traditional arts for their brands, Studio Enoy focuses on a grand total of four. Run by two 23-year-olds Bhavya Gupta and Archismita Deb, the year old brand makes a variety of products. Chanapatna, for starters, is a 200-year-old craft of toy making. Batik, on the other hand, is an old art form from Madhya Pradesh used to make saris, stoles, shirts, and even waistcoats. Turkish craft is used to make brass-wired inlay wood and coasters, whereas Nakkashi is used to make lamps and wood carvings. The brand, which can be found at stall no. 44, also makes desktop tables, accessories, and keychains.

Ramesh Tekan

One look at Ramesh Tekan’s stall and you’ll know how underrated rural art forms are. Run by the 45-year-old from Madhya Pradesh along with his wife Radha, Ramesh claims Gondi painting was practiced by his ancestors. “It’s been passed down for generations, really,” says Ramesh. “While in the olden days they painted on walls. our paintings are largely made on paper or canvas using the Gondi method, and are largely based on nature, animals, gods, and even mythologies and legends.”

Apart from paintings, the wall art is another feather in the talented duo’s hat. Ramesh claims he often uses Gondi art to paint murals at weddings, festivals, and parties. You can find him at stall no.10.

Tribal Tuma and Bamboo Art

Growing up in midst of urbanisation, anything tribal or rural is bound to be considered recherché. The work of the folks at Tribal Tuma and Bamboo Art, though, will leave you both curious and mesmerised. The Chhattisgarh based brand sells small fountains made out of bamboo, dreamcatchers carved out of wood, bows and arrows, and even wooden swords. You can spot them amidst of throng of gobsmacked admirers at the festival.

Bric-a-Brac

Running a business for twenty years isn’t a doddle, but Neelam Saigal seems to do it with an aura of nonchalance. She works closely with women who weave, offering them jobs to create some brilliant products. The Delhi-based brand also sells small furniture, crockery, lamps, and home decor products. You can find her at stall no. 1.

Kadambani Art

When you do something for over three decades, you can sure as hell be confident that you’ve mastered it. Kamla Kant Sahu from West Bengal, though, is simply great at what she does. Kadambani Art is all about products made from handpicked sea shells. These include crockery, accessories, frames, and even home decor products. While it might be difficult to get a hold of the talented artist herself, you can surely check out her brilliant products.

Previous Editions:

You can view the complete Kala Ghoda Arts Festival 2016 Handbook here.

Rameez Shaikh

Rameez Shaikh is a twenty-three year old writer. With a degree in journalism to his name, he's an aspiring author with an absolutely astounding admiration for alliteration. Leisure propels him to read, dance, pen fiction and gloat about himself in third person. On weekdays, he works as a features writer. On weekends, he's a Manchester United fan.

1 Comment

  1. Avatar
    Evelyn May 01, 2018

    Hi Rameez,

    thank you for this article, I see it’s a bit old but I wonder if you have a contact email or number for Artist Mr. Ramesh Tekan? I would love to buy one of his pieces and talk to him about a possible show.

    Reply

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